Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, Bluefin-21, was deployed from the vessel around 2am this morning

ADV Ocean Shield has arrived back in the search area.

The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, Bluefin-21, was deployed from the vessel around 2am this morning. It remains underwater on its search mission.

Over the next week, Bluefin-21 will search the remaining areas in the vicinity of the acoustic signals detected in early April by the Towed Pinger Locator deployed from Ocean Shield that are within its depth operating limits.

This continues the process that will ultimately enable the search team to discount or confirm the area of the acoustic signals as the final resting place of MH370.

Ocean Shield is anticipated to depart the search area on 28 May and return to Fleet Base West on 31 May where it will demobilise the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle equipment and disembark the support team.

The Chinese survey ship Zhu Kezhen departed Fremantle yesterday to begin conducting the bathymetric survey of the areas provided by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau. The bathymetric survey—or mapping of the ocean floor—is being done in preparation for a commercially contracted deep ocean search, including towed side-scan sonar operations.

Chinese ship Haixun 01 will today begin transiting to the survey area to support the survey operations, including the weekly transportation of survey data to Fremantle for further processing by Geoscience Australia.

The Australian Defence Force’s Military Coordination and Sub-Surface Planning team, in consultation with the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, will partner with Chinese units to conduct the survey.

The work continues to review and analyse all the data and information relating to the likely flight path of MH370, together with the information acquired in the course of the search to date. This work will confirm the best areas on which to focus an effective future search.

JACC Media Release
22 May 2014—pm

 

Series Elastic Snake Robot (SEA Snake). Torque Control Motions

Publicado el 21/05/2014

This video provides an overview of some initial torque-based motions for the Series Elastic Snake Robot (SEA Snake). Because the SEA Snake has the unique ability to accurately sense and control the torque of each of its joints, it can execute life-like compliant and adaptive motions, without complex controller or tactile sensing.

Source: CMUBiorobotics 5/22/14

Bluefin 21. The spare parts are expected to arrive in Geraldton later today

ADV Ocean Shield arrived at Geraldton, Western Australia, yesterday to begin preparations to receive spare parts related to the transponder mounted on theOcean Shield and the transponder mounted on the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, Bluefin-21.

The repairs are necessary to correct a hardware issue affecting the ability of the transponders to communicate with each other during a dive. The problem became apparent during Bluefin-21’s last mission on Tuesday.

Ocean Shield was originally going to Dampier to await the transponder parts, however, it was determined that the parts could be delivered to the ship more quickly via the port of Geraldton.

The spare parts are expected to arrive in Geraldton later today.

Once the replacement parts are installed, testing will be conducted at Geraldton prior to Ocean Shield transiting back to the search area.

Malaysian, Australian and Chinese authorities met over the weekend in Fremantle to discuss the bathymetric survey.

It was agreed that the Chinese survey ship Zhu Kezhen will conduct the bathymetric survey of the areas provided by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

Zhu Kezhen is scheduled to sail for the survey area on Wednesday, weather permitting.

Source:JACC

Bluefin 21 Searching for Malaysia 370: the Unmanned Undersea Vehicles (UUVs) connection

 

Publicado el 14/05/2014

Insight into how unmanned underwater vehicles are aiding in the search for the missing Malaysia 370 Boeing 777 airliner. John Keller discusses with David Kelly, president and CEO of Bluefin Robotics, whose company is provided the unmanned submersibles that are spearheading the search.

Source: Military & Aerospace Electronics

 

The Iranian Drones That Save Lives

 

Publicado el 15/05/2014

Your neighborhood quadcopter probably doesn’t have the ability to launch Hellfire missiles, but just saying the word “drone” conjures up images of flying, buzzing death. But what about drones’ potential for saving lives?

We’ve seen how drones can be a crucial asset to search and rescue operations, but Iran’s RTS Lab has taken an entirely new angle. RTS’s Pars drone carries a payload of life preservers that can be delivered to a drowning swimmer far faster than a lifeguard. As we saw in testing in the Caspian Sea, the drone can also work at night, using bright lights, biothermal sensors, and a built-in camera to stream video to rescuers on shore.

The concept works well, and it’s an excellent example of how powerful drones—which are cheaper and easier to use than just about any other aerial delivery vehicle—can actually be. Here in the US, where the FAA remains steadfast in its desire to squelch the nascent commercial drone industry, this Iranian drone built of Chinese parts sets an example of what can be done when we set our eyes to the skies to do good.

Source: Motherboard 

Bluefin-2. Spare parts for both defects will be dispatched from the United Kingdom

As advised yesterday, the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, Bluefin-21, was recovered about two hours into its first mission since returning to the search area so a communications problem could be investigated.

During the recovery, Bluefin-21 was damaged but was able to be repaired expeditiously with spare parts on board the ADV Ocean Shield.

Examination of the communications problem has established that a hardware defect exists in the transponder mounted on the Ocean Shield and that a defect may also exist in the transponder mounted on the Bluefin-21. This inhibits the ability of the two devices to communicate with each other.

As a consequence, spare parts for both defects will be dispatched from the United Kingdom. The parts are expected to arrive in Western Australia on Sunday.

Ocean Shield is currently en route to Dampier, Western Australia, to receive the transponder parts. The journey is anticipated to take a number of days. At this stage, Ocean Shield is expected go alongside so engineers can make a full assessment of the transponder repairs.

The Joint Agency Coordination Centre will provide further information regarding the serviceability of Bluefin-21 and the movements of Ocean Shield as it becomes available.

Source: JACC

Bluefin-21 was deployed from Ocean Shield yesterday afternoon but was recovered about two hours later to investigate communications problems

14 May 2014—pm. After a short port visit, the ADV Ocean Shield yesterday returned to the vicinity of the acoustic signals acquired by the Towed Pinger Locator in April to continue the underwater search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, Bluefin-21, was deployed from Ocean Shieldyesterday afternoon but was recovered about two hours later to investigate communications problems. Work continues to rectify the issue and to date, Bluefin-21 has not redeployed.

The international search effort presently includes assets from Australia, the People’s Republic of China, Malaysia and the United States.

The Joint Agency Coordination Centre (JACC) has relocated from Perth to Canberra and is based at the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development.

The JACC now includes a Military Coordination and Sub-Surface Planning Cell, which includes a Royal Australian Navy Hydrographer and US Navy Sea Systems Command representative.

Preparations to conduct the bathymetric survey are continuing. A Chinese survey ship is now in the search area and will assist in preparations for future operations.

Vessels from Australia, Malaysia and China and a RAAF aircraft remain on standby should any debris on the surface require investigation.

Source: JACC