Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) in medicine and medical-emergency situations

Aeryon Labs is featured in a Vital Signs Magazine article that discusses future applications for Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) in medicine and medical-emergency situations.

Formerly the territory of very experienced modelers and the military, RC helicopters and drones had a reputation of being extremely expensive, complicated vehicles to build and fly – needing skills similar to those possessed by actual helicopter pilots as the miniature controls and flight characteristics are virtually the same.

However, with the advent of very small, and inexpensive, electronic stabilization gyros, GPS units, OSD (on screen display) and real time video cameras with transmission to on-the-ground monitors, the use of these potentially privacy invading devices has skyrocketed. And with that increased use, operators have come up with very creative ideas regarding their use. The Transport Canada website recognizes the vast possible uses of the devices and lists the following:

You may have seen them hovering in your neighborhood already. Drones, UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), UAS (unmanned aircraft systems) remote control (RC) helicopters, quadcopters (four propellers) and octocopters (eight propellers) have become popular with the general public as control systems have made them simple enough to fly by anyone. (For this article, I will lump all the acronyms into one and simply call them drones.) Formerly the territory of very experienced modelers and the military, RC helicopters and drones had a reputation of being extremely expensive, complicated vehicles to build and fly – needing skills similar to those possessed by actual helicopter pilots as the miniature controls and flight characteristics are virtually the same. However, with the advent of very small, and inexpensive, electronic stabilization gyros, GPS units, OSD (on screen display) and real time video cameras with transmission to on-the-ground monitors, the use of these potentially privacy invading devices has skyrocketed. And with that increased use, operators have come up with very creative ideas regarding their use. The Transport Canada website recognizes the vast possible uses of the devices and lists the following:

Uses for unmanned air vehicles

Unmanned air vehicles operate in diverse environments, in high risk roles, including but not limited to: atmospheric research
(including weather and atmospheric gas sampling), scientific research, oceanographic research, geophysical research, mineral exploration,
imaging spectrometry, telecommunications relay platforms, police surveillance, border patrol and reconnaissance, survey and inspection
of remote power lines and pipelines, traffic and accident surveillance, emergency and disaster monitoring, cartography and mapping, search
and rescue, agricultural spraying, aerial photography, promotion and advertising, weather reconnaissance, flight research, and fire
fighting monitoring and management

Additionally, drones have been suggested for medication delivery and could be used to deliver devices such as two way radios or cell phones to victims of accidents in remote or difficult to access locations. The huge internet company, Amazon, has even suggested they would like to experiment with drone deliveries, something no government legislation is even remotely prepared for.

To read the full article, click here.

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