The Winners 13th RoboCup German 2014

RoboCup Major Leagues

International RoboCup Major League teams demonstrate the state-of-the-art in robotics with competitions in soccer, rescue and service robots.

Results SPL

In the Standard Platform League, soccer is played with a standardized robot platform, i.e. all teams use the same hardware and only differ in the software they develop. Until 2008, the standard platform was the four-legged robot Sony AIBO. For the sixth time at the RoboCup German Open, the humanoid robot Nao, manufactured by the company Aldebaran Robotics, is used as standard platform.

Nao is equipped with up to 25 actuated joints. In it’s head, two cameras are integrated for perceiving the environment. In it’s chest, sonar sensors can measure distances to other object on the field. In it’s feet there are sensors to measure ground contact and the contact with the ball. Three accelerometers and two gyroscopes allow measuring the pose of the robot’s torso. Teams of five robots play against each other on a 9 x 6 m² sized field. The robots are completely autonomous. However, through WLAN, they can communicate with each other and receive the decisions of the referee.

This year, there are two competitions in the Standard Platform League. On the one hand, there is the normal soccer competition, in which different teams play football against each other. For the first time, they are supported by a coach robot located at the field border that analyzes the game and makes tactical decisions. On the other hand, there is the new drop-in player competition, in which the opposing teams are randomly formed from robots from different research institutions. Thus robots have to cooperate with each other that run different software systems, which poses a particular challenge. In this new competition, the robot will be awarded to be the best player that was most successful in different team constellations and that presented itself as the best team player.

Teams

Bembelbots, Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany)
Berlin United – Nao Team Humboldt, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany)
B-Human, Universität Bremen und Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz (Germany)
HULKs, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg (Germany)
MRL-SPL, Qazvin Azad University (Iran)
Nao Devils Dortmund, Tu Dortmund University (Germany)
Nao-Team HTWK, HTWK Leipzig (Germany)
RoboEireann, NUI Maynooth (Ireland)
Z-Knipsers, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

Schedule

see the game schedule

Final Results

Final results of this league

League Chair

Dr. Thomas Röfer (DFKI Bremen)
chair-spl@robocupgermanopen.de

Rules

Actual SPL Rules

 

Results Humanoid Kid-Size League

The robots in the Humanoid League have a human-like body plan and human-like sensors. Each soccer team has four players of size up to 90 cm. In this year, the field has been enlarged significantly to 9 x 6 m.

The bipedal soccer soccer robots are fully autonomous, but are allowed to communicate over Wi-Fi. Among the key challenges for the humanoid robots are the generation of complex full-body movements and the maintenance of balance while walking on two legs and during kicks. When a robot falls, it must get up by itself to continue play.

In addition to the soccer tournament, the robots demonstrate in technical challenges advanced skills that are important for future soccer games: double passing, dribbling the ball around obstacles, high kicks, and throwing in the ball.

In contrast to the Standard Platform League, the Humanoid League robots are constructed by the teams on their own. Most humanoid robots are based on intelligent actuators. Microcontrollers interface up to two dozen of these motors and sensors like accelerometers, gyrometers, force sensors, and temperature sensors. Active sensors are not allowed. Up to two cameras are connected to a high-performance onboard computer, which analyzes the images to perceive the game situation in real time.

Teams

Berlin United – FUmanoids, Freie Universität Berlin (Germany)
Bold Hearts, University of Hertfordshire (United Kingdom)
Hamburg Bit-Bots , Universität Hamburg (Germany)
MRL-HSL, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin Branch (Iran)
NimbRo , Universität Bonn (Germany)
Team_RND, SEOUL TECH (Korea)
WF Wolves, Ostfalia (Germany)

Schedule

see the game schedule

Final Results

Final results of this league

League Chair

Prof. Dr. Sven Behnke (University of Bonn)
chair-humanoid@robocupgermanopen.de

Rules

Rules Humanoid Kid-Size

Results Soccer-3D Simulation League

In 3D soccer simulation league 11 vs 11 simulated Nao robots play soccer on a field that has the size of a real soccer field compared to the size of the robots. Physical properties like gravity, inertia are simulated as well as sensors and actuators including typical noise. Each robot has its own local view on the world and is controlled by a separate autonomous program.

The strength and scientific interest of this league is to provide a testbed for cooperative problem solving and autonomous learning of the robots without the cost and wear and tear of real hardware leagues.

Teams

FC Portugal, Universities of Aveiro, Porto and Minho (Portugal)
Kavosh, Amirkabir University of Technology (Iran)
L3M-SIM, Paris8 University (France)
magmaOffenburg, Hochschule Offenburg (Germany)
Paydar, Sharif University of Technology (Iran)
Photon, Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (Russian Federation)

Schedule

see the game schedule

Final Results

Final results of this league

Logfiles

Logfiles

League Chairs

Prof. Dr. Klaus Dorer (Hochschule Offenburg)
Stefan Glaser (Hochschule Offenburg)
chair-sim3d@robocupgermanopen.de

Rules

The rules for 3D soccer simulation will be finalized in November.

Results Rescue Robot League

In the rescue robot league robots from international teams operate in a simulated disaster area. The arena is resembling a scenario that can be found in an urban environment after, for example, an earth-quake or a tsunami.

Using different sensors like video-, infrared-, or 3D-cameras, laser scanners (LIDAR), ultra-sound sensors, gas sensors and microphones, the robots have to operate in the rescue arena and find the simulated victims hidden in the scenario. Doing so with an increased level of autonomy (less remote-control) is desired. In order to create more realistic victims, dolls are placed on heating blankets, which are simulating the body temperature of a human. For additional signs of live of the dolls are moving, making sounds and emit carbon dioxide (respiration).

The research foci include:

– the construction of mobile and robust robots,
– the development of algorithms for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM),
– the automatic analysis of the sensor data,
– the improvement of the autonomous capabilities of the robots,
– the research on efficient mobile manipulation, and
– the development of intuitive human machine interfaces supporting the operator of the robot.

The rescue robot league thus emphasizes the increased emphasis of RoboCup towards practical robotic applications.

Teams

AutonOHM, Nuremberg Institute of Technology Georg Simon Ohm (Germany)
CUAS-RRR, Fachhochschule Kärnten, Gemeinnützige Privatstiftung (Austria)
GETbot, Universität Paderborn (Germany)
Hector Darmstadt, Technische Universität Darmstadt (Germany)
RKRS, Benilde-St. Margaret’s School (United States)
Robokriti, IIITDM Jabalpur (India)
RRT-Team FH-Wels, University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria (Austria)
TEDUSAR, Technische Universität Graz (Austria)
Warwick Mobile Robotics, University of Warwick (England)

Schedule

see the game schedule

Final Results

Final results of this league

League Chairs

Chair: Dr. Sören Schwertfeger (Jacobs University Bremen)
Co-Chair: Adam Jacoff (NIST Gaithersburg, USA)
chair-rescue@robocupgermanopen.de

Rules

Rescue Robot League Rules 2014

Results At Home League

The RoboCup @ Home league aims to develop service and assistive robot technology with high relevance for future personal domestic applications. It is the largest international annual competition for autonomous service robots. A set of benchmark tests is used to evaluate the robots’ abilities and performance in a realistic non-standardized home environment setting. Focus lies on the following domains but is not limited to: Human-Robot-Interaction and Cooperation, Navigation and Mapping in dynamic environments, Computer Vision and Object Recognition under natural light conditions, Object Manipulation, Adaptive Behaviors, Behavior Integration, Ambient Intelligence, Standardization and System Integration.

Teams

Berlin United@home, Freie Universität Berlin (Germany)
BORG, University of Groningen (The Netherlands)
homer@UniKoblenz, Universität Koblenz-Landau (Germany)
MRL, Mechatronics Research Lab, Qazvin Azad University (Iran)
NimbRo @ Home, Universität Bonn (Germany)
SmartBots@Ulm, University of Applied Sciences Ulm (Germany)
Tech United, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
ToBI, Bielefeld University (Germany)

Schedule

see the game schedule

Final Results

Final results of this league

League Chairs

Dirk Holz, Universität Bonn
Sven Wachsmuth, Universität Bielefeld
chair-athome@robocupgermanopen.de

Results Logistics League

Logistics League sponsored by Festo (LLSF) is an industrial motivated RoboCup trait. Up to three mobile robots per team compete against the clock over the best in class solution. Challenging the team for excellence in logistics, the robots are required to establish and optimise a flow of material throughout a 12 by 6 meters production area. Two teams have to compete in the same production hall for a best solution.

LLSF is based on the mobile robotics platform Robotino® which delivers out of the box deploy ability as a mechatronic system. The challenge includes multi agent autonomy as well as precise motion control, computer vision, efficient scheduling, and manipulation.

In 2013 LLSF introduces a Referee Box system which will later on work as control server, enabling the flow of information which is of paramount importance on the way to match the complexity level of industrial Automated Guided Vehicles.

Teams

Carologistics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)
Leuphana, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg (Germany)
RBQT, Polytech’Lille, University of Science and Technology of Lille (France)
Solidus, HFTM Technical Institute of Applied Science Mittelland (Switzerland)
Team robOTTO, Otto-von-Guericke Universität Magdeburg (Germany)
TUMsBendingUnits, Technische Universität München (Germany)

Schedule

Game schedule with results

League Chair

Dr. Ulrich Karras
chair-logistics@robocupgermanopen.de

Rules

The new rulebook version 2014 will consider two essential new concepts for the LLSF league. At first, it will be used only one competition field. Two teams have to share this field and have to find a best solution in a direct competition. The second change affects the use of the RFID-units. Except of the delivery gates, they will be replaced by small real machines. A first version of the rulebook 2014 will be hopefully ready in late December 2013.

Results At Work Demonstration

RoboCup @ Work is a new competition in RoboCup that targets the use of robots in work-related scenarios. It aims to foster research and development that enables use of innovative mobile robots equipped with advanced manipulators for current and future industrial applications. Robots cooperate with human workers for complex tasks ranging from manufacturing, automation, and parts handling up to general logistics.

Teams

b-it-bots, Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University (Germany)
LUHbots, Leibniz Universität Hannover (Germany)
smartlab@work, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)
WF-Wolves, Ostfalia (Germany)

Schedule

see the game schedule

Final Results

Final results of this league

League Chair

Walter Nowak, Locomotec GmbH
chair-atwork@robocupgermanopen.de

Rules

RoboCup @ Work Rules 2013 (team leaders of registered teams will be informed about any rule update directly.)

 

RoboCup Junior Leagues

German RoboCup Junior teams compete in the final of the 14th German RoboCup Junior Competition in three disciplines – Rescue, Soccer and Dance.

 Dance

Results of finals in Dance

One or more robots come together with music, dressed in costume and moving in creative harmony.

Soccer

2-on-2 teams of autonomous mobile robots play in a highly dynamic environment, tracking a special light-emitting ball in an enclosed, landmarked field.

Results Soccer 1vs1 Lego
Results Soccer Open
Results Soccer 1vs1 Open
Results Soccer LWL Primary
Results Soccer LWL Secondary

Rescue

Robots identify victims within re-created disaster scenarios, varying in complexity from line-following on a flat surface to negotiating paths through obstacles on uneven terrain.

Results Rescue A Primary 1. Run
Results Rescue A Primary 2. Run
Results Rescue A Primary 3. Run
Results Rescue A Primary 4. Run

Results Rescue A Secondary 1. Run
Results Rescue A Secondary 2. Run
Results Rescue A Secondary 3. Run
Results Rescue A Secondary 4. Run

Results Rescue B 1. Run
Results Rescue B 2. Run
Results Rescue B 3. Run
Results Rescue B 4. Run

Source: RoboCup German 2014

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s